The future: that place where you grow your own clothes

by Daniela Cordero,

El futuro: ese lugar donde cultivarás tus propias prendas | itfashion.com

Imagine a natural fabric that grows by itself and a dress made without a single stitch: that’s the future of sustainable fashion, created from the intersection between synthetic biology and textile design. The ways to find these high performance fibers are becoming larger, and the desire of designers to take part of the natural world is irrefutable. With this scenario, the unprecedented scope in biomaterials and biomanufacturing are making more interesting the partnership between textile innovation, science, environmental and cultural awareness through fashion.

Lace from strawberry plant roots: Biolace

Explores the biological manufacturing, programming cellular morphogenesis to grow lace in strawberry plant roots. This breakthrough means that in the future we could design plants to perform specific functions.

El futuro: ese lugar donde cultivarás tus propias prendas | itfashion.com

+: carolecollet.com

Fabrics from red wine: Micro‘be’

Donna Franklin and Gary Cass creates fibers fermented by microbes. Theirs gowns of red wine, allows bacteria to grow surface. The result is a fabric that smells like a wine, and varies color depending on the liquid used: red wine: red fabric, white wine or beer: translucent fabric.

El futuro: ese lugar donde cultivarás tus propias prendas | itfashion.com

+:  bioalloy.org

Silk that comes from milk: Anke Domaske

The German fashion designer and biologist, has created in her laboratory in Bremen a fabric extracted from substandard milk, that is usually thrown away. She then uses the material to create dresses with a softer touch and cheaper value than silk.

El futuro: ese lugar donde cultivarás tus propias prendas | itfashion.com

+: qmilk.eu

Coffee for dress: S.Café

The coffee is to drink and to dress; this is what a Taiwanese company thought to devise a super high-tech eco fabric that boasts boasted to produce two shirts from the amount of coffee needed to make “one medium cup of coffee”. The roasting process of each grain is the answer for it to expand and multiply the necessary material for making the fabric.

+: scafefabrics.com

A dress of tea: Suzanne Lee

Her biodesigned methodology researches sustainable materials for future consumer products. A significant case is that of the jacket made from cellulose, which is produced by millions of tiny bacteria grown in bathtubs of green tea with sugar.

El futuro: ese lugar donde cultivarás tus propias prendas | itfashion.com

+ : biocouture.co.uk

Launch

This scenario is not only the future, but also the present and is big change in the food production and textile production, from which plants can achieve to replace textile machinery. To keep track, Launchcould be perhaps the best reference. This global initiative of NASA, Nike and the US State Department, seeks sustainable ideas to revolutionize the way textiles are made today. Invitations are open to all individuals or teams who can submit solutions, especially when considering that the world is expected to produce and estimate of 400 billion square meters of fabric, by 2015.

+: launch.org

Sources

Coolhunting | PSFK | Bioalloy