Cotton Love

by Maike Moncayo,

Undoubtedly, a shift is happening in the way we consume. Progressively more refined in recent years, shopping has become an art in itself. It testifies to the incredible success of sites like Coveteur, celebrating personal style, as every entry is fashioned like a devotional altar venerating the exquisite taste of their authors. And as shopping has transformed into a form of creative expression, in the shops words like “curation” and “editing” start to resonate more. In seeking a more exclusive and unique narrative, the fashion industry again draws inspiration from the art world, opening retail spaces that look like museums and where the careful selection of objects seems like a breath of fresh air amid the bewildering range of products.

A lot of time and preparation goes into each individual item, reflecting our passion for what we do and the deserved respect for each item.

As always, the Internet advances the trend with a new generation of online shops, which have perfected the art of the selectivity. One of those shops is Cotton Love from London that reclaims vintage as truly unique and interesting clothing. Beyond fads and with no hint of nostalgia, Ruth Nixon, alongside Nigel Hayward co-founder of the store, selects second-hand clothing with the eye of a curator. And it is this consistency and excellence that distinguishes Cotton Love from other stores. A fresh and contemporary reinterpretation of vintage clothing, that permeates in every corner of their exquisite website: from the refined styling orchestrated by Ruth, through the photos and to the collection of garments. “A lot of time and preparation goes into each individual item, reflecting our passion for what we do and the deserved respect for each item,” says the creative director.

Definitely, I think a few years ago there was a definite shift in attitudes towards consumerism – people became more concerned with the origins of their clothing and in turn appreciating their value.

Their love for well-made products is also reflected in their selection of artisan accessories signed by independent designers, which, along with vintage, make up the universe of Cotton Love. Delicacies like Antiatoms designs from Madrid, that retake the functionality of paper bags and envelopes in high quality leather. Brands like this do not only underline the vision of the sjop, while holding a certain exclusivity, and have an interesting story to tell. A value that today’s consumers demand more and more, as Ruth notes. “Definitely, I think a few years ago there was a definite shift in attitudes towards consumerism – people became more concerned with the origins of their clothing and in turn appreciating their value.” A shift she considers extremely important – developing respect for clothing and being aware of its real value – a knowledge that as we consume second-hand clothes, becomes established and commonplace.

Lovers of minimalism and functionality will find clothes that suit their personal taste at Cotton Love. “…worn amongst your modern wardrobe and styled to your personal taste, vintage clothing can form a modern (affordable) look in keeping with contemporary tastes and trends, whilst remaining sustainable.” And so, finally, a new chapter on vintage fashion is written.